Week of 8/6/18

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There are two new grants offering funding for arts and humanities projects in this round up. The research based Art Works grant offered by the National Endowment for the Arts has been released. It invites researchers to propose studies that examine topics related to any area(s) on the How Art Works system map. These projects have used quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-methods approaches, and have relied on primary and/or secondary data for analysis. The second grant was announced by the National Endowment for the Humanities for its Humanities Open Book Program which is designed to make outstanding out-of-print humanities books available to a wide audience. HRSA has announced that its Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program is open for application. The purpose of this program is to support community-based services aimed at improving the health status of children, adolescents, and families in rural and other underserved communities by increasing their access to health services. 

National Endowment for the Arts
Grant Title: NEA Research: Art Works, FY2019
Grant Info: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=307873
Details: The Arts Endowment’s support of a project may start on May 1, 2019, or any time thereafter. Grants generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years, with an exception for projects that include primary data collection as part of the proposed activity. Projects that include primary data collection may request up to three years. Projects that extend beyond one year will be required to submit an annual progress report. A grantee may not receive more than one National Endowment for the Arts grant for the same project during the same period of performance. Grant Program Description In September 2012, the National Endowment for the Arts' (NEA) Office of Research & Analysis published a five-year research agenda, supported by a system map and measurement model. Titled How Art Works, the report offers a framework for studying research topics critical to a broader public understanding of the arts' value and/or impact for individuals and communities. In December 2016, the NEA’s research office updated its five-year agenda for 2017-2021, which reflects a tighter focus on Arts Participation and Arts/Cultural Assets as essential research topics. Arts Participation, in the new agenda, remains inclusive of various modes of participation and specific arts activities. These modes are: attending arts events; reading literature; creating or performing art; consuming art via electronic media; and learning in the arts. Arts/Cultural Assets denotes artists and arts workers, arts venues and platforms, and arts organizations and industries.

National Endowment for the Humanities
Grant Title: Humanities Open Book Program
Grant Info: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=307760
Details: The Humanities Open Book Program is designed to make outstanding out-of-print humanities books available to a wide audience. By taking advantage of low-cost “ebook” technology, the program will allow teachers, students, scholars, and the public to read humanities books that have long been out of print. The Humanities Open Book Program is jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (Mellon). Traditionally, printed books have been the primary medium for expressing, communicating, and debating humanistic ideas. However, the vast majority of humanities books sell a small number of copies and then quickly go out of print. Most scholarly books printed since 1923 are not in the public domain and are not easily available to the general public. As a result, there is a huge, mostly untapped resource of remarkable scholarship going back decades that is largely unused by today’s scholars, teachers, students, and members of the public, many of whom turn first to the Internet when looking for information. Modern ebook technology can make these books far more accessible than they are today. NEH and Mellon are soliciting proposals from academic presses, scholarly societies, museums, and other institutions that publish books in the humanities to participate in the Humanities Open Book Program. Applicants will provide a list of previously published humanities books along with brief descriptions of the books and their intellectual significance. Depending on the length and topics of the books, the number to be digitized may vary. However, NEH and Mellon anticipate that applicants may propose to digitize a total that ranges from less than fifty to more than one hundred books. Awards will be given to secure the rights and digitize these books and make them available as Creative Commons-licensed “ebooks” that can be read by the public at no charge on computers, mobile devices, and ebook readers. The final ebook files must be in EPUB version 3.1 (or later) format, to ensure that the text is fully searchable and reflowable and that fonts are resizable on any e-reading device. Proposed books can be on any topic relevant to any humanities discipline. However, in recognition of two important upcoming anniversaries, NEH and Mellon encourage applicants to consider proposing books related to the following: •the 250th anniversary of the United States, coming in 2026. Applicants may wish to include important books relevant to the founding of the United States. •the hundredth anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment, coming in 2020. Applicants may wish to include important books relevant to the Nineteenth Amendment and women’s suffrage. Applicants are encouraged to form partnerships, if appropriate, when applying. For example, two or more presses could collaborate to bring together books published by their respective institutions on similar themes and topics.

Health Resources and Services Administration
Grant Title: Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program (HTPCP)
Grant Info: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=307730
Details: This notice solicits applications for the Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program (HTPCP). The purpose of this program is to support community-based services aimed at improving the health status of children, adolescents, and families in rural and other underserved communities by increasing their access to health services. This program supports the Health Resources and Services’ (HRSA's) goals to improve access to quality health care and services, build healthy communities, and improve health equity. Community-based programs and evidence-based models of care that build on existing community resources will be implemented and evaluated to demonstrate program impact. This program supports collaboration between local pediatric providers and community leaders in an effort to provide quality health care and preventive health services to children, adolescents, and families in rural and other underserved communities. HTPCP funding supports projects that provide clinical or public health services, and does not support research projects. HTPCP applications MUST represent either a new initiative (i.e., project that was not previously in existence) within the community or an innovative new component that builds upon an existing community-based program or initiative.

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